Department of Science and Mathematics

ADMINISTRATORS

ALFRED B. CAWTHORNE, Chair, Department of Science and Mathematics

MARTHA BUCKNER, Director, Nursing Program

ELLEN MUSICK, Coordinator, Nursing Program

MITCHELL LEIH, Advisor, Pre-Nursing Program

FACULTY

RICKEY D. BADLEY, Professor of Chemistry, 2011—

BS, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, 1984; PhD, Oklahoma State University, 1989.

JUDY J. BROWN, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2018—

BS, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 2011; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2018.

ALFRED B. CAWTHORNE, III, Professor of Physics, 2006—

BS, Eastern Nazarene College, 1992; PhD, University of Maryland, 1998.

STEPHANIE CAWTHORNE, Professor of Mathematics, 2006—

BS, Eastern Nazarene College, 1992; PhD, University of Maryland, 1998.

E. CHRISTIS FARRELL (part-time), Professor Emeritus of Biology, 1995-2014

BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1961; MS, The Ohio State University, 1968; PhD, The Ohio State University, 1971.

MATTHEW HUDDLESTON, Associate Professor of Physics, 2008—

BA, Greenville College, 1994; MSc, Rice University, 1999; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2003.

BENJAMIN S. JORGE, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2016—

BA, Rhodes College, 2005; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2014.

EWA A. KOWAL, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 2016—

BS, MS, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland, 2006; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2012.

NYKOLAUS REED, Associate Professor of Biology, 2013—

BS, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, 2002; PhD, Meharry Medical College, 2010.

JOSHUA RIO-ROSS, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 2017—

BS & BA, Oral Roberts University, 2011; MA, University of Missouri, 2013; MAR, Yale University, 2015.

ALISHA J. RUSSELL, Associate Professor of Biology, 2009—

BS, Baker University, 2003; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2010.

SAMUEL K. STUECKLE, Professor of Mathematics, 1996—

BS, Northwest Nazarene University, 1980; PhD, Clemson University, 1985.

DAVID M. WU, Professor of Engineering, 2018—

BS, National Taiwan Normal University, 1973; MS, New York University, 1977; PhD, New York University, 1981.

Department of Science and Mathematics General Information

The following majors are offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics: Applied Physics, Biology, Biology Education, Chemistry, Chemistry Education, General Science, Mathematics, Mathematics Education, Nursing, Physics, and Physics Education. This department offers minors in Biology, Environmental Science, Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics, General Science, and Mathematics. The courses offered are designed to provide a foundation allowing the student to pursue a technical profession, graduate school, or teaching.

The teaching majors are approved by the Tennessee Board of Education and are part of the unit accredited by NCATE.

Biology Major

Mission Statement

The biology major seeks to prepare graduates who have a broad-based understanding of biology, including experimental and analytical laboratory techniques, that will prepare them to succeed professionally and in graduate/professional programs.

Chemistry Major

Mission Statement

The chemistry major strives to develop graduates through a broad-based curriculum that forms an understanding of chemistry from historical, experimental, and theoretical perspectives. Graduates are prepared to assume roles as leaders in the chemical industry or to further their studies in graduate/professional programs.

Physics and Applied Physics Majors

Mission Statement

The physics and applied physics majors seek to prepare students with a foundational knowledge of analytical thinking, data collection and analysis, and experimental skills. This knowledge is coupled with acquiring understanding of the fundamental laws of the physical universe in a nurturing Christian environment. Development of the whole person for leadership and/or service roles is emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Majors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in the major.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to the major and to promote lifelong learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to their major.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

General Science Major

Mission Statement

The general science major seeks to prepare graduates who have a breadth of basic knowledge in biology, chemistry, and physics including laboratory techniques.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a General Science major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in biology, chemistry, and physics according to the levels of courses completed in each subject area.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to at least two of the areas of biology, chemistry, and physics and to promote lifelong learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to biology, chemistry, and/or physics.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

Mathematics Major

Mission Statement

The mathematics major seeks to prepare graduates who are competent in reasoning and problem solving skills that will prepare them for success in technical professions and in graduate studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mathematics major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Clearly express mathematical ideas, both verbally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate a comprehensive view of mathematics.
Mission statements and student learning outcomes for Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Mathematics Education, and Physics Education are in the Teacher Education Programs section of the Catalog.